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5 ways to increase employee satisfaction and 4 solutions if you do not feel satisfied at work.

5 ways to increase employee satisfaction and 4 solutions if you do not feel satisfied at work.

employee satisfaction

Everyone wants to feel appreciated. Whether this comes from a spouse or significant other, parents, children, or place of employment, people want to be recognized for their contributions. A lack of appreciation can cause resentment which can have a negative effect. This can erode relationships, whether it is with your significant other or within the workplace.

            It can be frustrating to toil away at your workplace and feeling like you’re not getting any recognition. This can lead to lower morale which in turn leads to a less productive employee. On the flipside, when the mission or purpose of an organization makes a person feel that their job is important business units realize a 51% reduction in absenteeism; a 64% drop in safety incidents; and 29% increase in quality. Other studies have shown that employees that feel valued and appreciated can be up to 50% more productive at work and happier. Evidently, recognition is important to an employee’s morale, without it they might begin to doubt if there is opportunity for advancement and begin to wonder if their position at their employer is right for them.

            Annie McKee, the author of How to be Happy at Work states that, “We all have a human need to be appreciated for our efforts, and so when your colleagues don’t notice [your contributions], it makes you feel as though you don’t belong.” You might also start to worry – justifiably – about your potential professional advancement. “Self-doubt starts to creep in, and you think, ‘If no one notices what I’m doing, how am I going to get ahead?’”. Not all is lost though according to Karen Dillon, author of the HBR Guide to Office Politics. She states that, “There are many ways to make sure people understand and see what you do.” The key, she says, is to find “diplomatic ways to toot your own horn.” She then gives suggestions on how to do this.

  • Be realistic. Before you take any action, ask yourself whether you’re being realistic about the amount of appreciation that you expect from your boss, colleagues, peers, and clients.
  • Talk to your boss. If your above-par efforts are going unsung, engage your boss in a conversation.
  • Increase your team’s visibility. If you manage a team, you also need to look for ways to explain to others what the group does and why it’s valuable.
  • Recognize others’ contributions. One surefire to get your own work noticed is, “paradoxically,” to “praise and appreciate others,”.
  • Validate yourself. While being appreciated and valued for your work is a wonderful thing, you can’t expect all your “motivation to come from honors, accolades, and public gratitude,”.
  • Consider moving on. If you continue to feel undervalued and unappreciated by your company, it might be a sign that it’s not the right place for you.

Anna Johansson wrote on insightful article titled 5 signs you’re appreciated at work (and what to do if you’re not) for NBC News. She writes that “Appreciation doesn’t need to be grandiose or lucrative; even a simple message can be enough to make someone feel appreciated, at least temporarily.”. She then goes on to give 5 signs of appreciation that are considered indicators if a person is working on a positive workplace:

  • Verbal praise. Verbal praise is one of the simplest and most effective forms of appreciation. It costs nothing, can be given in a matter of seconds, and can easily make someone’s day.
  • Raises and promotions. As a complement to the verbal praise, your company should be doling out at least occasional raises and promotions.
  • Employee appreciation events. Employee appreciation days are also effective ways to show employees they’re valued. Again, these don’t need to be expensive or grandiose; something as simple as a lunch party in the middle of a Friday can be enough to make people feel good.
  • Feedback. Speaking of feedback, formal feedback is another way to let employees know they’re appreciated.
  • Peer commentary. Finally, as a branch of verbal feedback, mutual employee commentary can be constructive to an environment of appreciation. 

Johannson then goes on to offer four solutions if you are not feeling appreciated at work. These include:

  • Talk to coworkers more openly. Be more open in talking to your coworkers and colleagues; give them feedback on their work, support them when you collaborate, and make them feel appreciated. 
  • Request more feedback. If you aren’t getting the feedback or appreciation you feel you deserve, consider requesting more feedback directly—as a form of feedback of your own. Tell your supervisors and bosses you’d like to receive more frequent, critical feedback on your performance, and thank them when they give you the opportunity.
  • Request more feedback. If you aren’t getting the feedback or appreciation you feel you deserve, consider requesting more feedback directly—as a form of feedback of your own. Tell your supervisors and bosses you’d like to receive more frequent, critical feedback on your performance, and thank them when they give you the opportunity.
  • Consider finding a new environment. If you aren’t receiving the benefits of an environment of mutual appreciation, consider moving to an environment where you can.

With all things considered, employee satisfaction is not only important for employee retention, but also contributes to higher morale which in turn leads to higher productivity. High turnover costs money, whereas little things to show that appreciation for your employees will contribute to a better workplace for everyone.

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